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Introducing the PiezoWave2 and Myofascial Acoustic Compression Therapy (MyACT) with aptitude to pinpoint the pain and treat at the source.

What is Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy, (or ESWT), is a new technology using shockwaves to treat chronic, painful conditions of the musculoskeletal system. A shockwave is an intense, but very short energy wave traveling faster than the speed of sound. The word “Extra-corporeal” means “outside the body” and refers to the fact that the shockwaves are generated outside the body.

What is the origin of ESWT?

The basic science behind ESWT is analogous to lithotripsy, the technology that uses acoustic shockwaves to break up kidney stones without surgery. The technique of using shockwaves to break up kidney stones has been around for a nearly a quarter century now, and in the process of treating thousands and thousands of patients, it was found that many people undergoing the procedure had other unrelated aches and pains disappear. It was at this point that scientists began to consider that shockwaves may have an effect to heal other sorts of tissues. Specialized machines were then developed specifically with the idea of using these shockwaves on other parts of the body, and this is the origin of ESWT. The type of shockwave therapy we use, then, is specialized to specifically help treat musculoskeletal conditions.

Focusing in on your pain

The acoustic waves generated by the PiezoWave2 painlessly pass through the body and converge at a point deep within the soft tissue to produce an intense, extremely short duration compression event. The focused acoustic compression is translated to tissue to provide a massage with pin – point accuracy to the affected area.

Patient guided pain relief

The sources of pain are not always found in the area where the pain seems to be radiating from. This is clinically called referred pain. The distancing of the pain sensation from its source can make treatment more difficult. Diagnosis of referred pain and the recognition of the originating pain triggering points can be accomplished using the PiezoWave2 . Abnormal musculoskeletal tissue can be “flared” with focused MyACT in order to define the areas that require treatment. This process of defining the origins of pain is guided by the patient through verbal feedback to the healthcare professional providing the treatment.

How long does treatment take?

  • A typical PiezoWave2 treatment takes between 10 and 20 minutes
  • Normally, 1-2 treatments per week are performed
  • A total of 3-5 treatments may be necessary before lasting improvement is achieved

What to expect during your MyACT treatment

  1. Your clinician will identify the treatment site or sites. They may mark these sites.
  2. They will then apply a thin coat of coupling gel. This gel helps to translate the acoustic sound waves generated by the therapy head to the body.
  3. The clinician will start the treatment at a very low output setting and increase the power to a level that you help define and is best suited for your condition. The output level and acoustic wave frequency rate may vary from location to location based on the depth and type of tissue being treated.
  4. As the clinician moves the therapy source around the treatment area, you may feel a deep, dull ache that is familiar to you as being like the feeling your condition produces. The clinician will ask you to report when you feel the ache and will adjust the output of the device to the appropriate level for your treatment. They may also ask you to confirm that the therapy source is still creating the ache and may adjust the location of the treatment based on your feedback. If at anytime the treatment becomes uncomfortable, mention this to the clinician and they will adjust the output level.
  5. After the treatment is completed, the coupling gel will be removed and you can return to your normal activities. You may experience some minor aches or discomfort after treatment. It is not unusual for patients to notice flushed or reddened skin around the treatment site.